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Red

by Ted Dekker
Series: The Circle Trilogy #2
400 pages, Fantasy
Reviewed by Permanent Rose

A great book with great moral messages, but quite a bit of violence.

Plot

Thomas Hunter starts dreaming of our world after 15 years of not dreaming in Other Earth. He needs to find a way to get an antivirus for the new airborne virus, the Raison Strain, that could kill half the world`s population in only three weeks` time.

Morality

The good guys are pretty much good, and the bad guys are pretty much bad. However, there are a few parts where some good guys go bad, where bad guys become good, and one part where a good guy becomes bad and then returns to being good.

Spiritual Content

They all worship Elyon, who's known as God here. Elyon goes to Other Earth as a man, is distrusted and killed, but in the end is resurrected and shows others the way to Life.

Violence

There's a lot of killing throughout the story: beating, stabbing, slashing with swords, and drowning. The Raison Strain virus is a quick killer and, as one might expect, takes up a large part of the plot. The Horde are also pretty gruesome characters. All three of the Circle Trilogy are heavily violent - this one no less so.

Drug and Alcohol Content

One or two mentions of alcoholic beverages. Thomas drinks something regularly that keeps him from dreaming of our world.

Sexual Content

Kisses between married or engaged couples and some mild seductive language between a married couple. Nothing more, though.

Crude or Profane Language or Content

None.

Conclusion

Red is a really great book with tons of suspense and a few mind-bending puzzle-like situations, with a lot of good moral values in it. There's enough action to keep you interested, though a lot of bloodshed makes it unsuitable for children.

Fun Score: 5
Values Score: 4.5
Written for Age: adult

Review Rating:

Average rating: 4 stars
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